Remember 911

I am not going to write a long post about this because many writers better than me will do so but I think I would to spend a little time reflecting.   There aren’t too many events in a lifetime where you can remember the exact thing you were doing when you first heard about it.  For me they include such things as the murder of John Lennon, Neil Armstrong’s walk on the moon, the death of the Princess of Wales and seared into my brain are the events of 911.

I was working two jobs at the time, full time as a security consultant and another 40 hours a week, supposedly part time as the Executive Officer of the Victorian Basketball League.  I’d come home from one job and sit down immediately to start work on the other.  That was the source of my ex-wifes comments that even when I was home I wasn’t there, and maybe there was some truth to that even if it was unfair.  But I digress.

In April 2001 I had attended a Counter Terrorist Conference in Washington DC and there were a number of keynote speakers form the US Intelligence community.  There were two major topics of conversation.  The first the fragmentary nature of the US CT effort and the second the threat Al Qaeda and Osama Bin Laden posed to the West.

So after my usual 16 hour working day on September 11 2001 I sat down and turned the TV on to watch the late news and watched in horror the footage of those planes crashing into the twin towers.  I spent the next several weeks in my security consultant role gethering and analysing whatever open source information we could find, writing threat assessments for our clients and reliving that horror as more and more details were revealed.

In my other role I had been organising our teams to compete in a National Basketball final series to be held in Bendigo which were cancelled because at the same time the domestic airline Ansett collapsed and I fielded a lot of complaints from people about how upset they were at the cancellation.  I wrote an article for our website at the time which said in part that we needed to put things into proper context.   Around the world tonight are, I wrote, are mothers and fathers, husbands and wives, sons and daughters, who would never see their loved ones again, not because those people had done anything wrong, but because someone somewhere had randomly chosen that they were to die as a part of campaign of hatred, as a symbol of philosophical difference.    I told people to put things into proper context, that the cancellation of a basketball series was not something which could truly be considered a disaster.  Crashing aeroplanes into buildings and destroying lives was a disaster and we should remember the sacrifice of those brave men and women who selflessly entered those burning buildings in an effort to save others lives.

On Friday I asked a number of people at work if they knew what the day was and for most it took a while to make the connection.  That came as a surprise to me and the only comfort I took was that when it hit them what the date was that there was an element of embarassment that they had forgotten.   Let us never forget because if we do and we let our guard down these things can happen again – we’ve seen it on October 12 a year later in Bali and on July 7 2005 in London.

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Belated Musical Monday – The Eagles, Long Road Out of Eden


I know I haven’t posted a musical Monday for a couple of weeks but I have had one CD on high rotation since it was released last Monday. The Eagles Long Run Out of Eden is already a favourite and there is one song already on Youtube. The album is classic Eagles, rocking guitar, four part harmony and terrific lyrics. Don’t just take my word for it, read the Rolling Stone and Billboard reviews, then listen and make up your own minds. Enjoy.

Belated Musical Monday – The Eagles, Long Road Out of Eden


I know I haven’t posted a musical Monday for a couple of weeks but I have had one CD on high rotation since it was released last Monday. The Eagles Long Run Out of Eden is already a favourite and there is one song already on Youtube. The album is classic Eagles, rocking guitar, four part harmony and terrific lyrics. Don’t just take my word for it, read the Rolling Stone and Billboard reviews, then listen and make up your own minds. Enjoy.

Belated Musical Monday – The Eagles, Long Road Out of Eden


I know I haven’t posted a musical Monday for a couple of weeks but I have had one CD on high rotation since it was released last Monday. The Eagles Long Run Out of Eden is already a favourite and there is one song already on Youtube. The album is classic Eagles, rocking guitar, four part harmony and terrific lyrics. Don’t just take my word for it, read the Rolling Stone and Billboard reviews, then listen and make up your own minds. Enjoy.

Josies Interview Part 1 – The Many Faces of Loz

Josie from Picking up the pieces partook in a an interview meme and threw out a challenge to people to allow her to interview them. The links to each of those interviews are here –

I am one amongst many and here is the answer to the first of five questions she has asked me.

1. I love the “Musical Monday” feature on your blog. I’m hearing lots of old favorites and finding some new ones. If you were to associate one song with each decade of your life, which song would it be, and why?

Musical Monday came about from laziness. I didn’t have the time to post and wanted something quick that would reveal a bit more about me. Thanks to youtube I found some videos of songs that have meant something to me over the years.

Narrowing a choice down to one song for a decade is not an easy task but I’ll give it a crack and try and explain why I have chosen the songs I have. In some cases I’ll repeat some of what I said in a meme I called Musical Memories early on in my blogging life. Music has always had a lot of power for me. I grew up listening to top 40 radio and well remember Casey Kasems American Top 40 countdown which I listened to on a crystal set that used to fade in and out before I was given my first transistor when I was about 8 years old one Christmas.

My Mum says I took my first steps towards Mickey Mouse on an old 22” TV when I heard the Mickey Mouse Club song, but my first memories of music were of “The Ballad of Davey Crockett” which Mum and Dad had on a 78 record which I used to ask her to lay over and over again on the black bakelite record player and radio that we had. I keep going to describe these things as old but at the time they probably weren’t. I must have been around three or four at the time which would have made it the early 60’s.

I’ll have to mention a few things in my teens because for me, like most of us, that was when my musical taste truly formed and I can’t in all honesty just choose one particular song from that decade.

Around 1969 I was given my first record by Father Christmas. Actually there were three in my Christmas stocking – Elvis Presley’s Edge of Reality and Suspicious Minds and an EP by Jim Nabors which from memory had Strangers in the Night on it. The latter I think was more a reflection of Mum and Dad’s taste than mine, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle and Nabor’s voice on the record was so different to Gomer’s that I did find it amazing.

But the song that defines my teen years is Desperado by The Eagles. I first heard it one rainy school day when an American exchange teacher played it for us one lunch time and I was hooked. A concept album where there was a theme across the entire LP, magnificent harmonies and songs that told a story. That album singularly coloured what I listened to forever which was outside what was being played on Top 40 radio at the time although the Eagles subsequently became huge. I had the great pleasure to see them live for the first time at their Farewell Tour Number 1 a few years ago here in Melbourne, which incidentally is available on DVD.

I wrote recently about a mate of mine called Fog and how he also opened my eyes to many great artists who remain favourites to this day – Phil Collins and Genesis, Supertramp, and Stevie Wonder to name a few – but there are a couple of songs that actually stick in my mind and whenever I hear them trigger memories of past lives.

Oddly enough the first is Afternoon Delight by the Starland Vocal Band. I clearly remember driving to the beach in my mate Ian’s Morris Minor with that song blasting out on high rotation on the ghetto blaster we’d taken with us. Two things stand out from that day, the first was when Ian turned down the wrong side of a median strip into the oncoming traffic and the second where driving slowly up a hill we had a wheel bounce past us which had obviously dropped off a car travelling behind us. We could never travel anywhere quickly in that car, in fact in the picture here on my first bush walk we actually had to get out and push it up a couple of hills.

The second song is Toto’s Africa which again was on high rotation the first year I was out of the police academy. Over the Christmas holidays I was stationed at the small town of Port Campbell on the west coast of Victoria for six weeks. That was 1983/84 and I was often out on patrol alone with not a lot to do other than explore some of the tourist attractions along the coast. I remember driving down one dirt track and seeing more tiger snakes slithering across the road than I thought could possibly exist in any one place. Needless to say I didn’t get out of the car on that road. The song coincided with my discovery of Wilbur Smith and his stories of Africa which have also become great favourites over the years.

In my 30’s pay TV came to Australia and with it CMT which opened up a whole new world to me. I was then and still am now a sucker for songs that tell a story and country music therefore struck an immediate chord with me. None of what was played on that TV channel made it to radio here, unless you happened to be travelling through the bush and managed to pick up some regional radio stations before they became clones of city radio. If I had to pick one song out of that time it would be “The Road” by Sawyer Brown.

In my 40’s I discovered post-grunge, Sister Hazel, Edwin McCain, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Gin Blossoms etc. We had the advantage of being able to download music and I could sample stuff I’d not only never heard of before but that I probably would have glanced over in the CD racks at the record stores. If I was to choose one song here that is characteristic of that genre it would be Champagne High by Sister Hazel. I could have chosen any one of dozens of songs from this period. I pulled together a lot of compilation CD’s during that time which I tongue-in-cheek labelled lozmetal 1 and lozalt 1 and so on. My kids always gave me a hard time about the metal songs not being real metal but still for the most part liked my choices.

I’m only now a couple of months into my 50’s so I’ll reserve judgement on trying to anticipate where my musical tastes will roam over the next ten years. One thing I will predict is that I will continue to return to many of the songs that I have enjoyed over the years – excluding the Ballad of Davey Crockett and any Jim Nabor’s songs of course.

This one has been fun Josie and a perfect intro for me into some of the tougher questions to come.

Josies Interview Part 1 – The Many Faces of Loz

Josie from Picking up the pieces partook in a an interview meme and threw out a challenge to people to allow her to interview them. The links to each of those interviews are here –

I am one amongst many and here is the answer to the first of five questions she has asked me.

1. I love the “Musical Monday” feature on your blog. I’m hearing lots of old favorites and finding some new ones. If you were to associate one song with each decade of your life, which song would it be, and why?

Musical Monday came about from laziness. I didn’t have the time to post and wanted something quick that would reveal a bit more about me. Thanks to youtube I found some videos of songs that have meant something to me over the years.

Narrowing a choice down to one song for a decade is not an easy task but I’ll give it a crack and try and explain why I have chosen the songs I have. In some cases I’ll repeat some of what I said in a meme I called Musical Memories early on in my blogging life. Music has always had a lot of power for me. I grew up listening to top 40 radio and well remember Casey Kasems American Top 40 countdown which I listened to on a crystal set that used to fade in and out before I was given my first transistor when I was about 8 years old one Christmas.

My Mum says I took my first steps towards Mickey Mouse on an old 22” TV when I heard the Mickey Mouse Club song, but my first memories of music were of “The Ballad of Davey Crockett” which Mum and Dad had on a 78 record which I used to ask her to lay over and over again on the black bakelite record player and radio that we had. I keep going to describe these things as old but at the time they probably weren’t. I must have been around three or four at the time which would have made it the early 60’s.

I’ll have to mention a few things in my teens because for me, like most of us, that was when my musical taste truly formed and I can’t in all honesty just choose one particular song from that decade.

Around 1969 I was given my first record by Father Christmas. Actually there were three in my Christmas stocking – Elvis Presley’s Edge of Reality and Suspicious Minds and an EP by Jim Nabors which from memory had Strangers in the Night on it. The latter I think was more a reflection of Mum and Dad’s taste than mine, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle and Nabor’s voice on the record was so different to Gomer’s that I did find it amazing.

But the song that defines my teen years is Desperado by The Eagles. I first heard it one rainy school day when an American exchange teacher played it for us one lunch time and I was hooked. A concept album where there was a theme across the entire LP, magnificent harmonies and songs that told a story. That album singularly coloured what I listened to forever which was outside what was being played on Top 40 radio at the time although the Eagles subsequently became huge. I had the great pleasure to see them live for the first time at their Farewell Tour Number 1 a few years ago here in Melbourne, which incidentally is available on DVD.

I wrote recently about a mate of mine called Fog and how he also opened my eyes to many great artists who remain favourites to this day – Phil Collins and Genesis, Supertramp, and Stevie Wonder to name a few – but there are a couple of songs that actually stick in my mind and whenever I hear them trigger memories of past lives.

Oddly enough the first is Afternoon Delight by the Starland Vocal Band. I clearly remember driving to the beach in my mate Ian’s Morris Minor with that song blasting out on high rotation on the ghetto blaster we’d taken with us. Two things stand out from that day, the first was when Ian turned down the wrong side of a median strip into the oncoming traffic and the second where driving slowly up a hill we had a wheel bounce past us which had obviously dropped off a car travelling behind us. We could never travel anywhere quickly in that car, in fact in the picture here on my first bush walk we actually had to get out and push it up a couple of hills.

The second song is Toto’s Africa which again was on high rotation the first year I was out of the police academy. Over the Christmas holidays I was stationed at the small town of Port Campbell on the west coast of Victoria for six weeks. That was 1983/84 and I was often out on patrol alone with not a lot to do other than explore some of the tourist attractions along the coast. I remember driving down one dirt track and seeing more tiger snakes slithering across the road than I thought could possibly exist in any one place. Needless to say I didn’t get out of the car on that road. The song coincided with my discovery of Wilbur Smith and his stories of Africa which have also become great favourites over the years.

In my 30’s pay TV came to Australia and with it CMT which opened up a whole new world to me. I was then and still am now a sucker for songs that tell a story and country music therefore struck an immediate chord with me. None of what was played on that TV channel made it to radio here, unless you happened to be travelling through the bush and managed to pick up some regional radio stations before they became clones of city radio. If I had to pick one song out of that time it would be “The Road” by Sawyer Brown.

In my 40’s I discovered post-grunge, Sister Hazel, Edwin McCain, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Gin Blossoms etc. We had the advantage of being able to download music and I could sample stuff I’d not only never heard of before but that I probably would have glanced over in the CD racks at the record stores. If I was to choose one song here that is characteristic of that genre it would be Champagne High by Sister Hazel. I could have chosen any one of dozens of songs from this period. I pulled together a lot of compilation CD’s during that time which I tongue-in-cheek labelled lozmetal 1 and lozalt 1 and so on. My kids always gave me a hard time about the metal songs not being real metal but still for the most part liked my choices.

I’m only now a couple of months into my 50’s so I’ll reserve judgement on trying to anticipate where my musical tastes will roam over the next ten years. One thing I will predict is that I will continue to return to many of the songs that I have enjoyed over the years – excluding the Ballad of Davey Crockett and any Jim Nabor’s songs of course.

This one has been fun Josie and a perfect intro for me into some of the tougher questions to come.

Josies Interview Part 1 – The Many Faces of Loz

Josie from Picking up the pieces partook in a an interview meme and threw out a challenge to people to allow her to interview them. The links to each of those interviews are here –

I am one amongst many and here is the answer to the first of five questions she has asked me.

1. I love the “Musical Monday” feature on your blog. I’m hearing lots of old favorites and finding some new ones. If you were to associate one song with each decade of your life, which song would it be, and why?

Musical Monday came about from laziness. I didn’t have the time to post and wanted something quick that would reveal a bit more about me. Thanks to youtube I found some videos of songs that have meant something to me over the years.

Narrowing a choice down to one song for a decade is not an easy task but I’ll give it a crack and try and explain why I have chosen the songs I have. In some cases I’ll repeat some of what I said in a meme I called Musical Memories early on in my blogging life. Music has always had a lot of power for me. I grew up listening to top 40 radio and well remember Casey Kasems American Top 40 countdown which I listened to on a crystal set that used to fade in and out before I was given my first transistor when I was about 8 years old one Christmas.

My Mum says I took my first steps towards Mickey Mouse on an old 22” TV when I heard the Mickey Mouse Club song, but my first memories of music were of “The Ballad of Davey Crockett” which Mum and Dad had on a 78 record which I used to ask her to lay over and over again on the black bakelite record player and radio that we had. I keep going to describe these things as old but at the time they probably weren’t. I must have been around three or four at the time which would have made it the early 60’s.

I’ll have to mention a few things in my teens because for me, like most of us, that was when my musical taste truly formed and I can’t in all honesty just choose one particular song from that decade.

Around 1969 I was given my first record by Father Christmas. Actually there were three in my Christmas stocking – Elvis Presley’s Edge of Reality and Suspicious Minds and an EP by Jim Nabors which from memory had Strangers in the Night on it. The latter I think was more a reflection of Mum and Dad’s taste than mine, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle and Nabor’s voice on the record was so different to Gomer’s that I did find it amazing.

But the song that defines my teen years is Desperado by The Eagles. I first heard it one rainy school day when an American exchange teacher played it for us one lunch time and I was hooked. A concept album where there was a theme across the entire LP, magnificent harmonies and songs that told a story. That album singularly coloured what I listened to forever which was outside what was being played on Top 40 radio at the time although the Eagles subsequently became huge. I had the great pleasure to see them live for the first time at their Farewell Tour Number 1 a few years ago here in Melbourne, which incidentally is available on DVD.

I wrote recently about a mate of mine called Fog and how he also opened my eyes to many great artists who remain favourites to this day – Phil Collins and Genesis, Supertramp, and Stevie Wonder to name a few – but there are a couple of songs that actually stick in my mind and whenever I hear them trigger memories of past lives.

Oddly enough the first is Afternoon Delight by the Starland Vocal Band. I clearly remember driving to the beach in my mate Ian’s Morris Minor with that song blasting out on high rotation on the ghetto blaster we’d taken with us. Two things stand out from that day, the first was when Ian turned down the wrong side of a median strip into the oncoming traffic and the second where driving slowly up a hill we had a wheel bounce past us which had obviously dropped off a car travelling behind us. We could never travel anywhere quickly in that car, in fact in the picture here on my first bush walk we actually had to get out and push it up a couple of hills.

The second song is Toto’s Africa which again was on high rotation the first year I was out of the police academy. Over the Christmas holidays I was stationed at the small town of Port Campbell on the west coast of Victoria for six weeks. That was 1983/84 and I was often out on patrol alone with not a lot to do other than explore some of the tourist attractions along the coast. I remember driving down one dirt track and seeing more tiger snakes slithering across the road than I thought could possibly exist in any one place. Needless to say I didn’t get out of the car on that road. The song coincided with my discovery of Wilbur Smith and his stories of Africa which have also become great favourites over the years.

In my 30’s pay TV came to Australia and with it CMT which opened up a whole new world to me. I was then and still am now a sucker for songs that tell a story and country music therefore struck an immediate chord with me. None of what was played on that TV channel made it to radio here, unless you happened to be travelling through the bush and managed to pick up some regional radio stations before they became clones of city radio. If I had to pick one song out of that time it would be “The Road” by Sawyer Brown.

In my 40’s I discovered post-grunge, Sister Hazel, Edwin McCain, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Gin Blossoms etc. We had the advantage of being able to download music and I could sample stuff I’d not only never heard of before but that I probably would have glanced over in the CD racks at the record stores. If I was to choose one song here that is characteristic of that genre it would be Champagne High by Sister Hazel. I could have chosen any one of dozens of songs from this period. I pulled together a lot of compilation CD’s during that time which I tongue-in-cheek labelled lozmetal 1 and lozalt 1 and so on. My kids always gave me a hard time about the metal songs not being real metal but still for the most part liked my choices.

I’m only now a couple of months into my 50’s so I’ll reserve judgement on trying to anticipate where my musical tastes will roam over the next ten years. One thing I will predict is that I will continue to return to many of the songs that I have enjoyed over the years – excluding the Ballad of Davey Crockett and any Jim Nabor’s songs of course.

This one has been fun Josie and a perfect intro for me into some of the tougher questions to come.

Musical Memories

I’m not sure whether a meme has been done along these lines before but it may be a bit of fun.

Rules are simple.

1. Name between 5 & 10 songs that have made an impact on your life. I’ll leave it up to you to decide how many you wish to describe

2.Pass it onto five other people with a link back to your own post and this one as the original.

Musical Memories

1. Ballad of Davy Crockett – We didn’t have a radiogram when we were kids but we did have a Bakelite record player and am radio. Mum had a huge collection of 78rpm records but the only one I ever wanted to listen to was the Ballad of Davy Crockett. Sadly I still remember the words. I must have been around 4 or 5 years old when I first heard it.

2. Edge of Reality – Elvis Presley; this was the first 45rpm record that I ever owned and I was given it one Christmas along with Suspicious Minds and a Jim Nabors EP. Don’t know what Father Christmas was thinking when he gave me the last, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle at the time. Now Suspicious Minds was a number 1 hit in 1969 so that would have made me 12 years old.

3. Eagle Rock – Daddy Cool. Well known to Australians and still gets a great run at parties for people of all ages – my kids even love it. I remember listening to this in the back of a bus on a school history excursion to the old gold mining town of Maldon with everyone singing along at the tops of their voices. This would have been 1971-72.

4. Desperado – The Eagles. I was introduced to them by an American exchange teacher who played it to us one rainy-day lunchtime at school and I was hooked immediately and have been ever since. I’ve written about this previously here.

5. For a Dancer – Jackson Browne. I could pick anyone of a number of Jackson Browne songs but this one is a favourite. I remember seeing him when he came to Melbourne in around 1978 just after Running on Empty was released. He was late coming on stage because there had been some hold up with the transport of the trucks from Sydney, but when he did come on he treated us to four hour of magic. I got into trouble from my mother because I walked in at 4am. The concert had finished too late for us to catch public transport so we walked home from the city.

6. Summer of 69 – Bryan Adams. Because it makes me remember good times. 1969 I was actually a bit young to be doing those things but certainly in the 70’s a group of mates and I had a bit of a band thing going. Many nights were spent sitting around living rooms playing guitars and harmonicas, singing the songs we cared about. As students our disposable income was low so we made out own entertainment because we couldn’t afford the club or disco scene.

7. Boys of Summer – Don Henley. As above really, everytime I hear it I’m transported back to those days of summer of my childhood.

8. The Dance – Garth Brooks. This was played at my Dad’s funeral and the words say it all.

9.The Living Years – Mike and the Mechanics. I think this is a song for most people about their fathers. It came out long before my Dad passed away but has held a particular poignancy for me since he died.

10. I hope you Dance – Leeann Womack. I have used words from this song on birthday cards or special occasions for my own kids and nieces and nephews since it was released.

Now for the tags – and I know I have tagged each of you before – as usual only participate if you feel that it is a worthwhile topic.

Paisley’s list is here

Holly’s list is here

Finn’s

Jeff’s list is here

Amber’s list is here

Apologies to anyone who has already strated a meme like this one.

Here are some others who have also published their lists –

Jodi

Wonder

Greg

Drive by Blogger

Michelle

Reema

Cyberoutlaw

Laurie Anne

Chris

Cynthia

Ari

2Writehands

Heather

Meleah Rebeccah

Lifesinger

Charles

Anna

Laura

Anthony

Patrick

Carly

Meyauw

Somerset Bob

Davie B

Dorothy

Anna

Musical Memories

I’m not sure whether a meme has been done along these lines before but it may be a bit of fun.

Rules are simple.

1. Name between 5 & 10 songs that have made an impact on your life. I’ll leave it up to you to decide how many you wish to describe

2.Pass it onto five other people with a link back to your own post and this one as the original.

Musical Memories

1. Ballad of Davy Crockett – We didn’t have a radiogram when we were kids but we did have a Bakelite record player and am radio. Mum had a huge collection of 78rpm records but the only one I ever wanted to listen to was the Ballad of Davy Crockett. Sadly I still remember the words. I must have been around 4 or 5 years old when I first heard it.

2. Edge of Reality – Elvis Presley; this was the first 45rpm record that I ever owned and I was given it one Christmas along with Suspicious Minds and a Jim Nabors EP. Don’t know what Father Christmas was thinking when he gave me the last, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle at the time. Now Suspicious Minds was a number 1 hit in 1969 so that would have made me 12 years old.

3. Eagle Rock – Daddy Cool. Well known to Australians and still gets a great run at parties for people of all ages – my kids even love it. I remember listening to this in the back of a bus on a school history excursion to the old gold mining town of Maldon with everyone singing along at the tops of their voices. This would have been 1971-72.

4. Desperado – The Eagles. I was introduced to them by an American exchange teacher who played it to us one rainy-day lunchtime at school and I was hooked immediately and have been ever since. I’ve written about this previously here.

5. For a Dancer – Jackson Browne. I could pick anyone of a number of Jackson Browne songs but this one is a favourite. I remember seeing him when he came to Melbourne in around 1978 just after Running on Empty was released. He was late coming on stage because there had been some hold up with the transport of the trucks from Sydney, but when he did come on he treated us to four hour of magic. I got into trouble from my mother because I walked in at 4am. The concert had finished too late for us to catch public transport so we walked home from the city.

6. Summer of 69 – Bryan Adams. Because it makes me remember good times. 1969 I was actually a bit young to be doing those things but certainly in the 70’s a group of mates and I had a bit of a band thing going. Many nights were spent sitting around living rooms playing guitars and harmonicas, singing the songs we cared about. As students our disposable income was low so we made out own entertainment because we couldn’t afford the club or disco scene.

7. Boys of Summer – Don Henley. As above really, everytime I hear it I’m transported back to those days of summer of my childhood.

8. The Dance – Garth Brooks. This was played at my Dad’s funeral and the words say it all.

9.The Living Years – Mike and the Mechanics. I think this is a song for most people about their fathers. It came out long before my Dad passed away but has held a particular poignancy for me since he died.

10. I hope you Dance – Leeann Womack. I have used words from this song on birthday cards or special occasions for my own kids and nieces and nephews since it was released.

Now for the tags – and I know I have tagged each of you before – as usual only participate if you feel that it is a worthwhile topic.

Paisley’s list is here

Holly’s list is here

Finn’s

Jeff’s list is here

Amber’s list is here

Apologies to anyone who has already strated a meme like this one.

Here are some others who have also published their lists –

Jodi

Wonder

Greg

Drive by Blogger

Michelle

Reema

Cyberoutlaw

Laurie Anne

Chris

Cynthia

Ari

2Writehands

Heather

Meleah Rebeccah

Lifesinger

Charles

Musical Memories

I’m not sure whether a meme has been done along these lines before but it may be a bit of fun.

Rules are simple.

1. Name between 5 & 10 songs that have made an impact on your life. I’ll leave it up to you to decide how many you wish to describe

2.Pass it onto five other people with a link back to your own post and this one as the original.

Musical Memories

1. Ballad of Davy Crockett – We didn’t have a radiogram when we were kids but we did have a Bakelite record player and am radio. Mum had a huge collection of 78rpm records but the only one I ever wanted to listen to was the Ballad of Davy Crockett. Sadly I still remember the words. I must have been around 4 or 5 years old when I first heard it.

2. Edge of Reality – Elvis Presley; this was the first 45rpm record that I ever owned and I was given it one Christmas along with Suspicious Minds and a Jim Nabors EP. Don’t know what Father Christmas was thinking when he gave me the last, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle at the time. Now Suspicious Minds was a number 1 hit in 1969 so that would have made me 12 years old.

3. Eagle Rock – Daddy Cool. Well known to Australians and still gets a great run at parties for people of all ages – my kids even love it. I remember listening to this in the back of a bus on a school history excursion to the old gold mining town of Maldon with everyone singing along at the tops of their voices. This would have been 1971-72.

4. Desperado – The Eagles. I was introduced to them by an American exchange teacher who played it to us one rainy-day lunchtime at school and I was hooked immediately and have been ever since. I’ve written about this previously here.

5. For a Dancer – Jackson Browne. I could pick anyone of a number of Jackson Browne songs but this one is a favourite. I remember seeing him when he came to Melbourne in around 1978 just after Running on Empty was released. He was late coming on stage because there had been some hold up with the transport of the trucks from Sydney, but when he did come on he treated us to four hour of magic. I got into trouble from my mother because I walked in at 4am. The concert had finished too late for us to catch public transport so we walked home from the city.

6. Summer of 69 – Bryan Adams. Because it makes me remember good times. 1969 I was actually a bit young to be doing those things but certainly in the 70’s a group of mates and I had a bit of a band thing going. Many nights were spent sitting around living rooms playing guitars and harmonicas, singing the songs we cared about. As students our disposable income was low so we made out own entertainment because we couldn’t afford the club or disco scene.

7. Boys of Summer – Don Henley. As above really, everytime I hear it I’m transported back to those days of summer of my childhood.

8. The Dance – Garth Brooks. This was played at my Dad’s funeral and the words say it all.

9.The Living Years – Mike and the Mechanics. I think this is a song for most people about their fathers. It came out long before my Dad passed away but has held a particular poignancy for me since he died.

10. I hope you Dance – Leeann Womack. I have used words from this song on birthday cards or special occasions for my own kids and nieces and nephews since it was released.

Now for the tags – and I know I have tagged each of you before – as usual only participate if you feel that it is a worthwhile topic.

Paisley’s list is here

Holly’s list is here

Finn’s

Jeff’s list is here

Amber’s list is here

Apologies to anyone who has already strated a meme like this one.

Here are some others who have also published their lists –

Jodi

Wonder

Greg

Drive by Blogger

Michelle

Reema

Cyberoutlaw

Laurie Anne

Chris

Cynthia

Ari

2Writehands

Heather

Meleah Rebeccah

Lifesinger

Charles

Anna

Laura

Anthony

Patrick

Carly

Meyauw

Somerset Bob

Davie B

Dorothy

Anna

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