Volvo Drivers

I’ve been back home from the south coast of New South Wales for a couple of weeks now and haven’t found the time to blog much.  Lots to say and so little time.   However, I thought I’d mention this observation and ask whether it is the same in other parts of the world.

On our last nigh of holiday we decided to have fish and chips for dinner.  Now in a seaside town during the high holiday season that usually means waiting up to an hour for the food after ordering.  Generally it’s worth the wait and I usually take a book to read while I’m waiting anyway.

On this night as i drove down the main street a volvo driver decided to stop in the middle of the road in front of me, no indicator, no spare car space for him to wait for, he just decided to prop.  Being in holiday mode myself I probably showed a bit more patience than usual and waited behind him, figuring that sooner or later he would decide what he wanted to do.  But he didn’t.  And as I sat and watched as a couple of minutes rushed by I saw around 20 other people enter the fish and chip shop ahead of me.   Already resigned to a long wait I knew it would be longer because that Volvo driver was totally oblivious to everyone else around him.

Then on the way home the next day I found myself passing another Volvo driver around a dozen times.  He would slow down on the sections of the Princes Highway that had double lines or many curves where there was no opportunity to pass and then when an overtaking lane appeared he would move from 20 kph below the speed limit to 10 above it.  What do these people think?  Is it a deliberate ploy to make the rest of the non-Volvo world angry?   Anyway I’d speed up enough to pass him, then slow back down to the speed limit only to find he would pass me again and wait until we hit the no passing areas before once again dropping to 20kph below the speed limit.

So tell me – have you noticed the same type of behaviour from volvo drivers where you come from?

Advertisements

Volvo Drivers

I’ve been back home from the south coast of New South Wales for a couple of weeks now and haven’t found the time to blog much.  Lots to say and so little time.   However, I thought I’d mention this observation and ask whether it is the same in other parts of the world.

On our last nigh of holiday we decided to have fish and chips for dinner.  Now in a seaside town during the high holiday season that usually means waiting up to an hour for the food after ordering.  Generally it’s worth the wait and I usually take a book to read while I’m waiting anyway.

On this night as i drove down the main street a volvo driver decided to stop in the middle of the road in front of me, no indicator, no spare car space for him to wait for, he just decided to prop.  Being in holiday mode myself I probably showed a bit more patience than usual and waited behind him, figuring that sooner or later he would decide what he wanted to do.  But he didn’t.  And as I sat and watched as a couple of minutes rushed by I saw around 20 other people enter the fish and chip shop ahead of me.   Already resigned to a long wait I knew it would be longer because that Volvo driver was totally oblivious to everyone else around him.

Then on the way home the next day I found myself passing another Volvo driver around a dozen times.  He would slow down on the sections of the Princes Highway that had double lines or many curves where there was no opportunity to pass and then when an overtaking lane appeared he would move from 20 kph below the speed limit to 10 above it.  What do these people think?  Is it a deliberate ploy to make the rest of the non-Volvo world angry?   Anyway I’d speed up enough to pass him, then slow back down to the speed limit only to find he would pass me again and wait until we hit the no passing areas before once again dropping to 20kph below the speed limit.

So tell me – have you noticed the same type of behaviour from volvo drivers where you come from?

Patience


In reading the book Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff by Richard Carlson I was struck by a simple piece of advice and that was to have patience. Way too often we allow things to upset us and a recurring theme in Richard’s books is to ask ourselves the question “Will this matter a year from now?”

Of course many of the small things that increase our stress will not matter at all in a year and if we can understand that we will reduce our stress levels. He suggests taking a step back when we find ourselves getting angry or upset about something. If we learn to practice patience then it becomes easier not to stress about some of those things whether it be waiting at a red light or standing in a queue, or being interrupted when doing something we regard as important.

In those situations recently I have taken his advice and the mere uttering of the word “patience” has the effect of making those little stresses less important.

Patience


In reading the book Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff by Richard Carlson I was struck by a simple piece of advice and that was to have patience. Way too often we allow things to upset us and a recurring theme in Richard’s books is to ask ourselves the question “Will this matter a year from now?”

Of course many of the small things that increase our stress will not matter at all in a year and if we can understand that we will reduce our stress levels. He suggests taking a step back when we find ourselves getting angry or upset about something. If we learn to practice patience then it becomes easier not to stress about some of those things whether it be waiting at a red light or standing in a queue, or being interrupted when doing something we regard as important.

In those situations recently I have taken his advice and the mere uttering of the word “patience” has the effect of making those little stresses less important.

Patience


In reading the book Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff by Richard Carlson I was struck by a simple piece of advice and that was to have patience. Way too often we allow things to upset us and a recurring theme in Richard’s books is to ask ourselves the question “Will this matter a year from now?”

Of course many of the small things that increase our stress will not matter at all in a year and if we can understand that we will reduce our stress levels. He suggests taking a step back when we find ourselves getting angry or upset about something. If we learn to practice patience then it becomes easier not to stress about some of those things whether it be waiting at a red light or standing in a queue, or being interrupted when doing something we regard as important.

In those situations recently I have taken his advice and the mere uttering of the word “patience” has the effect of making those little stresses less important.