An old Crisis

From an old journal – Thursday 8th July 1991

I mentioned to someone the other day that it was my birthday last Sunday and after I said I was 34 they said “Have you gone through midlife crisis yet?” Well firstly I didn’t think I’d reached a crisis until I realised that 34 years old is pretty close to the middle of my life. So now I am in crisis.

Advertisements

An old Crisis

From an old journal – Thursday 8th July 1991

I mentioned to someone the other day that it was my birthday last Sunday and after I said I was 34 they said “Have you gone through midlife crisis yet?” Well firstly I didn’t think I’d reached a crisis until I realised that 34 years old is pretty close to the middle of my life. So now I am in crisis.

Wisdom


From Journal 1 – 28th February, 1978

Wisdom is not born of age but of experience. Thus a person young in years but old in experience may be considered wise, but an old person with little experience would not be. I would describe wisdom as a series of laws, morals, ethics, guidelines – call it what you will – born of mistakes and learnt by experience.

It annoys me somewhat that age alone, at times, is considered a prerequisite of wisdom. People too often are blind to the wisdom of the young and of those not of their own society. Who is less wise, a tribal shaman telling his people they must take part in fertility rites if their crops are to be successful, or a Christian priest telling parents not to grieve for a dead child? I shall leave it up to you to puzzle it out.

From Journal 1 – 1st March 1978

Stuff it, I will try to explain what I was talking about in the above entry, if only to clear it up in m own head. The answer is both, and neither, since they believe in what they are doing. The shaman believes the fertility rites are necessary because for as long as he can remember, and for generations before that, they have been performed (i.e. the wrath of a God, the sins of the villagers etc. all have ritual associated with them). Thus his wisdom is based on generations of experience. The priests wisdom however, is based on generations of faith. It cannot be said that the shamans or the priests wisdom is borne of individual experience since both are based on social experience. I would say therefore that this is not true wisdom and would qualify my definition above as follows – wisdom is a series of laws, morals, ethics guidelines…born of mistakes and learnt by individual experience.

********************************************************
POSTSCRIPT
I don’t think I was all that wise 30 years ago. There is a certain pomposity and self assurance that seems to have gotten lost somewhere between then and now. I no longer have such absolute beliefs, nor do I think that I am quite as intolerant of some people and some situations that I may have been back then.

I actually think that the mind does become cluttered as you get older, that original thought is far more likely at 20 than at 50 years of age. Perhaps it is because as we get older we have had far more exposure to external influences, maybe the brain just fills up, perhaps the neural pathways are no longer as clear as they once were.

In those days I was particularly intolerant of religion, maybe it was the bad Sunday School experiences, or maybe exposure at University to a more “liberal” environment to that I was brought up in. I was enjoying the exposure to different ways of thinking and organised religion seemed to me to be a straitjacket on an enquiring mind. And in dismissing it I was probably as guilty of blinkered thought as the people I was criticising.

For many years there was little time to even wonder about what it was like to wonder. The child, then the young man, got lost somewhere along the way. In reading these old journals it is clearly evident that the person writing them changed – not really surprising I guess – because the stages of life changed. This was neither good nor bad, just different, the priorities f life changed. When the kids came along I was able to write about them, the things they said and did, the holidays taken, but some years I was able to do more of that than others. In recent years, as the work hours increased, the writing decreased, and there are gaps where I have no doubt I have missed things.

I have written before about some of the music I loved. In 1977 Dan Fogelberg released an album called “Netherlands” on which was a song called “Lessons Learned” and some of the words are appropriate here –

Lessons learned
Are like bridges burned

You only need to cross them but once.

Is the knowledge gained

Worth the price of the pain?

Are the spoils worth the cost of the hunt?

The key is we need to learn from the lessons because it is only then that we can adapt them, mould them, temper them and wield them so that they become knowledge. The fifty year old likes to think that he knows that now, just as I’m sure that the 20 year old was absolutely certain that he was wise beyond his years at the time.

Image by J D Challenger can be viewed here.

Wisdom


From Journal 1 – 28th February, 1978

Wisdom is not born of age but of experience. Thus a person young in years but old in experience may be considered wise, but an old person with little experience would not be. I would describe wisdom as a series of laws, morals, ethics, guidelines – call it what you will – born of mistakes and learnt by experience.

It annoys me somewhat that age alone, at times, is considered a prerequisite of wisdom. People too often are blind to the wisdom of the young and of those not of their own society. Who is less wise, a tribal shaman telling his people they must take part in fertility rites if their crops are to be successful, or a Christian priest telling parents not to grieve for a dead child? I shall leave it up to you to puzzle it out.

From Journal 1 – 1st March 1978

Stuff it, I will try to explain what I was talking about in the above entry, if only to clear it up in m own head. The answer is both, and neither, since they believe in what they are doing. The shaman believes the fertility rites are necessary because for as long as he can remember, and for generations before that, they have been performed (i.e. the wrath of a God, the sins of the villagers etc. all have ritual associated with them). Thus his wisdom is based on generations of experience. The priests wisdom however, is based on generations of faith. It cannot be said that the shamans or the priests wisdom is borne of individual experience since both are based on social experience. I would say therefore that this is not true wisdom and would qualify my definition above as follows – wisdom is a series of laws, morals, ethics guidelines…born of mistakes and learnt by individual experience.

********************************************************
POSTSCRIPT
I don’t think I was all that wise 30 years ago. There is a certain pomposity and self assurance that seems to have gotten lost somewhere between then and now. I no longer have such absolute beliefs, nor do I think that I am quite as intolerant of some people and some situations that I may have been back then.

I actually think that the mind does become cluttered as you get older, that original thought is far more likely at 20 than at 50 years of age. Perhaps it is because as we get older we have had far more exposure to external influences, maybe the brain just fills up, perhaps the neural pathways are no longer as clear as they once were.

In those days I was particularly intolerant of religion, maybe it was the bad Sunday School experiences, or maybe exposure at University to a more “liberal” environment to that I was brought up in. I was enjoying the exposure to different ways of thinking and organised religion seemed to me to be a straitjacket on an enquiring mind. And in dismissing it I was probably as guilty of blinkered thought as the people I was criticising.

For many years there was little time to even wonder about what it was like to wonder. The child, then the young man, got lost somewhere along the way. In reading these old journals it is clearly evident that the person writing them changed – not really surprising I guess – because the stages of life changed. This was neither good nor bad, just different, the priorities f life changed. When the kids came along I was able to write about them, the things they said and did, the holidays taken, but some years I was able to do more of that than others. In recent years, as the work hours increased, the writing decreased, and there are gaps where I have no doubt I have missed things.

I have written before about some of the music I loved. In 1977 Dan Fogelberg released an album called “Netherlands” on which was a song called “Lessons Learned” and some of the words are appropriate here –

Lessons learned
Are like bridges burned

You only need to cross them but once.

Is the knowledge gained

Worth the price of the pain?

Are the spoils worth the cost of the hunt?

The key is we need to learn from the lessons because it is only then that we can adapt them, mould them, temper them and wield them so that they become knowledge. The fifty year old likes to think that he knows that now, just as I’m sure that the 20 year old was absolutely certain that he was wise beyond his years at the time.

Image by J D Challenger can be viewed here.

Wisdom


From Journal 1 – 28th February, 1978

Wisdom is not born of age but of experience. Thus a person young in years but old in experience may be considered wise, but an old person with little experience would not be. I would describe wisdom as a series of laws, morals, ethics, guidelines – call it what you will – born of mistakes and learnt by experience.

It annoys me somewhat that age alone, at times, is considered a prerequisite of wisdom. People too often are blind to the wisdom of the young and of those not of their own society. Who is less wise, a tribal shaman telling his people they must take part in fertility rites if their crops are to be successful, or a Christian priest telling parents not to grieve for a dead child? I shall leave it up to you to puzzle it out.

From Journal 1 – 1st March 1978

Stuff it, I will try to explain what I was talking about in the above entry, if only to clear it up in m own head. The answer is both, and neither, since they believe in what they are doing. The shaman believes the fertility rites are necessary because for as long as he can remember, and for generations before that, they have been performed (i.e. the wrath of a God, the sins of the villagers etc. all have ritual associated with them). Thus his wisdom is based on generations of experience. The priests wisdom however, is based on generations of faith. It cannot be said that the shamans or the priests wisdom is borne of individual experience since both are based on social experience. I would say therefore that this is not true wisdom and would qualify my definition above as follows – wisdom is a series of laws, morals, ethics guidelines…born of mistakes and learnt by individual experience.

********************************************************
POSTSCRIPT
I don’t think I was all that wise 30 years ago. There is a certain pomposity and self assurance that seems to have gotten lost somewhere between then and now. I no longer have such absolute beliefs, nor do I think that I am quite as intolerant of some people and some situations that I may have been back then.

I actually think that the mind does become cluttered as you get older, that original thought is far more likely at 20 than at 50 years of age. Perhaps it is because as we get older we have had far more exposure to external influences, maybe the brain just fills up, perhaps the neural pathways are no longer as clear as they once were.

In those days I was particularly intolerant of religion, maybe it was the bad Sunday School experiences, or maybe exposure at University to a more “liberal” environment to that I was brought up in. I was enjoying the exposure to different ways of thinking and organised religion seemed to me to be a straitjacket on an enquiring mind. And in dismissing it I was probably as guilty of blinkered thought as the people I was criticising.

For many years there was little time to even wonder about what it was like to wonder. The child, then the young man, got lost somewhere along the way. In reading these old journals it is clearly evident that the person writing them changed – not really surprising I guess – because the stages of life changed. This was neither good nor bad, just different, the priorities f life changed. When the kids came along I was able to write about them, the things they said and did, the holidays taken, but some years I was able to do more of that than others. In recent years, as the work hours increased, the writing decreased, and there are gaps where I have no doubt I have missed things.

I have written before about some of the music I loved. In 1977 Dan Fogelberg released an album called “Netherlands” on which was a song called “Lessons Learned” and some of the words are appropriate here –

Lessons learned
Are like bridges burned

You only need to cross them but once.

Is the knowledge gained

Worth the price of the pain?

Are the spoils worth the cost of the hunt?

The key is we need to learn from the lessons because it is only then that we can adapt them, mould them, temper them and wield them so that they become knowledge. The fifty year old likes to think that he knows that now, just as I’m sure that the 20 year old was absolutely certain that he was wise beyond his years at the time.

Image by J D Challenger can be viewed here.

Spider

From Old Journal 7th July – 1992 – Glen was aged 6.

“Dad, I’ve got a spider on me!” Glen yelled.

“Then brush it off, ” I yelled back.

“No! I can’t find a brush!”

Spider

From Old Journal 7th July – 1992 – Glen was aged 6.

“Dad, I’ve got a spider on me!” Glen yelled.

“Then brush it off, ” I yelled back.

“No! I can’t find a brush!”

Of Dirty Chooks


From an old Journal – 12 November 1989
It’s funny how things don’t really change. The other day I was out in the car with Luke and Glen when Luke said, “There’s a horse!”

Both Glen and I looked and Luke started giggling “Made you look you dirty chook”, he said.

I remember the same phrase from my days at school and it’s probably been around for much longer than that. All these things that Luke is learning have obviously been passed on from schoolyard generation to generation and will no doubt continue to be. It’s something I hadn’t thought about fro years and it surprised and delighted me to hear it again.

Glen tried to mimic Luke. “There’s a horse you chook,” he said. And Luke as so often does sighed and patronisingly told his little brother the correct phrase.

Glen tried again. “Look a dirty chook,” he yelled with conviction.

All three of us laughed with Luke shaking his head wisely “Glen always gets it wrong doesn’t he Dad.”
The photo is of my boys today, a far cry from the 4 and 5 year olds of that post above. And you know what they still get on well most of the time, but love nothing better than taking the piss out of each other when they can.

Of Dirty Chooks


From an old Journal – 12 November 1989
It’s funny how things don’t really change. The other day I was out in the car with Luke and Glen when Luke said, “There’s a horse!”

Both Glen and I looked and Luke started giggling “Made you look you dirty chook”, he said.

I remember the same phrase from my days at school and it’s probably been around for much longer than that. All these things that Luke is learning have obviously been passed on from schoolyard generation to generation and will no doubt continue to be. It’s something I hadn’t thought about for years and it surprised and delighted me to hear it again.

Glen tried to mimic Luke. “There’s a horse you chook,” he said. And Luke as so often does sighed and patronisingly told his little brother the correct phrase.

Glen tried again. “Look a dirty chook,” he yelled with conviction.

All three of us laughed with Luke shaking his head wisely “Glen always gets it wrong doesn’t he Dad.”
The photo is of my boys today, a far cry from the 4 and 5 year olds of that post above. And you know what they still get on well most of the time, but love nothing better than taking the piss out of each other when they can.

Of Dirty Chooks


From an old Journal – 12 November 1989
It’s funny how things don’t really change. The other day I was out in the car with Luke and Glen when Luke said, “There’s a horse!”

Both Glen and I looked and Luke started giggling “Made you look you dirty chook”, he said.

I remember the same phrase from my days at school and it’s probably been around for much longer than that. All these things that Luke is learning have obviously been passed on from schoolyard generation to generation and will no doubt continue to be. It’s something I hadn’t thought about for years and it surprised and delighted me to hear it again.

Glen tried to mimic Luke. “There’s a horse you chook,” he said. And Luke as so often does sighed and patronisingly told his little brother the correct phrase.

Glen tried again. “Look a dirty chook,” he yelled with conviction.

All three of us laughed with Luke shaking his head wisely “Glen always gets it wrong doesn’t he Dad.”
The photo is of my boys today, a far cry from the 4 and 5 year olds of that post above. And you know what they still get on well most of the time, but love nothing better than taking the piss out of each other when they can.

« Older entries