Musical Memories

I’m not sure whether a meme has been done along these lines before but it may be a bit of fun.

Rules are simple.

1. Name between 5 & 10 songs that have made an impact on your life. I’ll leave it up to you to decide how many you wish to describe

2.Pass it onto five other people with a link back to your own post and this one as the original.

Musical Memories

1. Ballad of Davy Crockett – We didn’t have a radiogram when we were kids but we did have a Bakelite record player and am radio. Mum had a huge collection of 78rpm records but the only one I ever wanted to listen to was the Ballad of Davy Crockett. Sadly I still remember the words. I must have been around 4 or 5 years old when I first heard it.

2. Edge of Reality – Elvis Presley; this was the first 45rpm record that I ever owned and I was given it one Christmas along with Suspicious Minds and a Jim Nabors EP. Don’t know what Father Christmas was thinking when he gave me the last, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle at the time. Now Suspicious Minds was a number 1 hit in 1969 so that would have made me 12 years old.

3. Eagle Rock – Daddy Cool. Well known to Australians and still gets a great run at parties for people of all ages – my kids even love it. I remember listening to this in the back of a bus on a school history excursion to the old gold mining town of Maldon with everyone singing along at the tops of their voices. This would have been 1971-72.

4. Desperado – The Eagles. I was introduced to them by an American exchange teacher who played it to us one rainy-day lunchtime at school and I was hooked immediately and have been ever since. I’ve written about this previously here.

5. For a Dancer – Jackson Browne. I could pick anyone of a number of Jackson Browne songs but this one is a favourite. I remember seeing him when he came to Melbourne in around 1978 just after Running on Empty was released. He was late coming on stage because there had been some hold up with the transport of the trucks from Sydney, but when he did come on he treated us to four hour of magic. I got into trouble from my mother because I walked in at 4am. The concert had finished too late for us to catch public transport so we walked home from the city.

6. Summer of 69 – Bryan Adams. Because it makes me remember good times. 1969 I was actually a bit young to be doing those things but certainly in the 70’s a group of mates and I had a bit of a band thing going. Many nights were spent sitting around living rooms playing guitars and harmonicas, singing the songs we cared about. As students our disposable income was low so we made out own entertainment because we couldn’t afford the club or disco scene.

7. Boys of Summer – Don Henley. As above really, everytime I hear it I’m transported back to those days of summer of my childhood.

8. The Dance – Garth Brooks. This was played at my Dad’s funeral and the words say it all.

9.The Living Years – Mike and the Mechanics. I think this is a song for most people about their fathers. It came out long before my Dad passed away but has held a particular poignancy for me since he died.

10. I hope you Dance – Leeann Womack. I have used words from this song on birthday cards or special occasions for my own kids and nieces and nephews since it was released.

Now for the tags – and I know I have tagged each of you before – as usual only participate if you feel that it is a worthwhile topic.

Paisley’s list is here

Holly’s list is here

Finn’s

Jeff’s list is here

Amber’s list is here

Apologies to anyone who has already strated a meme like this one.

Here are some others who have also published their lists –

Jodi

Wonder

Greg

Drive by Blogger

Michelle

Reema

Cyberoutlaw

Laurie Anne

Chris

Cynthia

Ari

2Writehands

Heather

Meleah Rebeccah

Lifesinger

Charles

Musical Memories

I’m not sure whether a meme has been done along these lines before but it may be a bit of fun.

Rules are simple.

1. Name between 5 & 10 songs that have made an impact on your life. I’ll leave it up to you to decide how many you wish to describe

2.Pass it onto five other people with a link back to your own post and this one as the original.

Musical Memories

1. Ballad of Davy Crockett – We didn’t have a radiogram when we were kids but we did have a Bakelite record player and am radio. Mum had a huge collection of 78rpm records but the only one I ever wanted to listen to was the Ballad of Davy Crockett. Sadly I still remember the words. I must have been around 4 or 5 years old when I first heard it.

2. Edge of Reality – Elvis Presley; this was the first 45rpm record that I ever owned and I was given it one Christmas along with Suspicious Minds and a Jim Nabors EP. Don’t know what Father Christmas was thinking when he gave me the last, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle at the time. Now Suspicious Minds was a number 1 hit in 1969 so that would have made me 12 years old.

3. Eagle Rock – Daddy Cool. Well known to Australians and still gets a great run at parties for people of all ages – my kids even love it. I remember listening to this in the back of a bus on a school history excursion to the old gold mining town of Maldon with everyone singing along at the tops of their voices. This would have been 1971-72.

4. Desperado – The Eagles. I was introduced to them by an American exchange teacher who played it to us one rainy-day lunchtime at school and I was hooked immediately and have been ever since. I’ve written about this previously here.

5. For a Dancer – Jackson Browne. I could pick anyone of a number of Jackson Browne songs but this one is a favourite. I remember seeing him when he came to Melbourne in around 1978 just after Running on Empty was released. He was late coming on stage because there had been some hold up with the transport of the trucks from Sydney, but when he did come on he treated us to four hour of magic. I got into trouble from my mother because I walked in at 4am. The concert had finished too late for us to catch public transport so we walked home from the city.

6. Summer of 69 – Bryan Adams. Because it makes me remember good times. 1969 I was actually a bit young to be doing those things but certainly in the 70’s a group of mates and I had a bit of a band thing going. Many nights were spent sitting around living rooms playing guitars and harmonicas, singing the songs we cared about. As students our disposable income was low so we made out own entertainment because we couldn’t afford the club or disco scene.

7. Boys of Summer – Don Henley. As above really, everytime I hear it I’m transported back to those days of summer of my childhood.

8. The Dance – Garth Brooks. This was played at my Dad’s funeral and the words say it all.

9.The Living Years – Mike and the Mechanics. I think this is a song for most people about their fathers. It came out long before my Dad passed away but has held a particular poignancy for me since he died.

10. I hope you Dance – Leeann Womack. I have used words from this song on birthday cards or special occasions for my own kids and nieces and nephews since it was released.

Now for the tags – and I know I have tagged each of you before – as usual only participate if you feel that it is a worthwhile topic.

Paisley’s list is here

Holly’s list is here

Finn’s

Jeff’s list is here

Amber’s list is here

Apologies to anyone who has already strated a meme like this one.

Here are some others who have also published their lists –

Jodi

Wonder

Greg

Drive by Blogger

Michelle

Reema

Cyberoutlaw

Laurie Anne

Chris

Cynthia

Ari

2Writehands

Heather

Meleah Rebeccah

Lifesinger

Charles

Anna

Laura

Anthony

Patrick

Carly

Meyauw

Somerset Bob

Davie B

Dorothy

Anna

Musical Memories

I’m not sure whether a meme has been done along these lines before but it may be a bit of fun.

Rules are simple.

1. Name between 5 & 10 songs that have made an impact on your life. I’ll leave it up to you to decide how many you wish to describe

2.Pass it onto five other people with a link back to your own post and this one as the original.

Musical Memories

1. Ballad of Davy Crockett – We didn’t have a radiogram when we were kids but we did have a Bakelite record player and am radio. Mum had a huge collection of 78rpm records but the only one I ever wanted to listen to was the Ballad of Davy Crockett. Sadly I still remember the words. I must have been around 4 or 5 years old when I first heard it.

2. Edge of Reality – Elvis Presley; this was the first 45rpm record that I ever owned and I was given it one Christmas along with Suspicious Minds and a Jim Nabors EP. Don’t know what Father Christmas was thinking when he gave me the last, although I was a fan of Gomer Pyle at the time. Now Suspicious Minds was a number 1 hit in 1969 so that would have made me 12 years old.

3. Eagle Rock – Daddy Cool. Well known to Australians and still gets a great run at parties for people of all ages – my kids even love it. I remember listening to this in the back of a bus on a school history excursion to the old gold mining town of Maldon with everyone singing along at the tops of their voices. This would have been 1971-72.

4. Desperado – The Eagles. I was introduced to them by an American exchange teacher who played it to us one rainy-day lunchtime at school and I was hooked immediately and have been ever since. I’ve written about this previously here.

5. For a Dancer – Jackson Browne. I could pick anyone of a number of Jackson Browne songs but this one is a favourite. I remember seeing him when he came to Melbourne in around 1978 just after Running on Empty was released. He was late coming on stage because there had been some hold up with the transport of the trucks from Sydney, but when he did come on he treated us to four hour of magic. I got into trouble from my mother because I walked in at 4am. The concert had finished too late for us to catch public transport so we walked home from the city.

6. Summer of 69 – Bryan Adams. Because it makes me remember good times. 1969 I was actually a bit young to be doing those things but certainly in the 70’s a group of mates and I had a bit of a band thing going. Many nights were spent sitting around living rooms playing guitars and harmonicas, singing the songs we cared about. As students our disposable income was low so we made out own entertainment because we couldn’t afford the club or disco scene.

7. Boys of Summer – Don Henley. As above really, everytime I hear it I’m transported back to those days of summer of my childhood.

8. The Dance – Garth Brooks. This was played at my Dad’s funeral and the words say it all.

9.The Living Years – Mike and the Mechanics. I think this is a song for most people about their fathers. It came out long before my Dad passed away but has held a particular poignancy for me since he died.

10. I hope you Dance – Leeann Womack. I have used words from this song on birthday cards or special occasions for my own kids and nieces and nephews since it was released.

Now for the tags – and I know I have tagged each of you before – as usual only participate if you feel that it is a worthwhile topic.

Paisley’s list is here

Holly’s list is here

Finn’s

Jeff’s list is here

Amber’s list is here

Apologies to anyone who has already strated a meme like this one.

Here are some others who have also published their lists –

Jodi

Wonder

Greg

Drive by Blogger

Michelle

Reema

Cyberoutlaw

Laurie Anne

Chris

Cynthia

Ari

2Writehands

Heather

Meleah Rebeccah

Lifesinger

Charles

Anna

Laura

Anthony

Patrick

Carly

Meyauw

Somerset Bob

Davie B

Dorothy

Anna

The Power of Music

Having been scanning photos for the past week has lead to a trigger of memories where you can recall the actual time, place and circumstances surrounding the capturing of that particular moment in time and it got me thinking about other things that trigger memory such as smell and music. So I thought I’d write a little about some of the music that means something to me.

Elvis Presley – I remember arguing with some other kids at Primary School about who was better Elvis or The Beatles and I argued strongly for the former. I grew up watching Elvis movies and the first records I ever bought were his – Edge of Reality, Suspicious Minds, In the Ghetto and Don’t Cry Daddy. I knew them word for word and some might say that the famous Joyce snarl that appears occasionally on my face may have had it’s genesis some time during those Saturday afternoon matinees at the Padua Theatre in Brunswick.

The Eagles – around Form 2 we had an American exchange teacher at Burwood High School and he brought with him The Eagles album Desperado. We must have had a rainy day one day and stayed in the class room over lunch time listening to the sublime harmonies and ballads of these blokes on a concept album of all things. Something at that time that I’d never heard of before. I have remained a fan ever since. I remember when the album “One of These Nights” was released that there was a special on the radio which I taped. At that time my mate Fog and I were working over Christmas at a wire factory and we played it over and over again.

James Taylor – Fire and Rain, Carolina on my mind, Sweet Baby James and others were favourites. I had a group of friends and we called ourselves The Diggers. We were mainly mates from High School plus a few who we met through our university studies. Not a lot in the way of disposable income so we spent a lot of time sitting around houses playing guitars and harmonicas singing lots of James Taylor and Bob Dylan songs.

Little River Band – Harmonies every bit as good as those of the Eagles and for a while The Diggers mucked around with a band playing LRB songs. We called ourselves The Sentimental Blokes and were legends in our own loungerooms. We never had any intention of performing anywhere it was just a way of having fun and a lot of laughs.

At least three of those guys have passed away now but whenever I hear those songs I’m transported back to a simpler time and place and the boisterousness of youth, with the voices of mates still ringing loudly in my ears.

The Power of Music

Having been scanning photos for the past week has lead to a trigger of memories where you can recall the actual time, place and circumstances surrounding the capturing of that particular moment in time and it got me thinking about other things that trigger memory such as smell and music. So I thought I’d write a little about some of the music that means something to me.

Elvis Presley – I remember arguing with some other kids at Primary School about who was better Elvis or The Beatles and I argued strongly for the former. I grew up watching Elvis movies and the first records I ever bought were his – Edge of Reality, Suspicious Minds, In the Ghetto and Don’t Cry Daddy. I knew them word for word and some might say that the famous Joyce snarl that appears occasionally on my face may have had it’s genesis some time during those Saturday afternoon matinees at the Padua Theatre in Brunswick.

The Eagles – around Form 2 we had an American exchange teacher at Burwood High School and he brought with him The Eagles album Desperado. We must have had a rainy day one day and stayed in the class room over lunch time listening to the sublime harmonies and ballads of these blokes on a concept album of all things. Something at that time that I’d never heard of before. I have remained a fan ever since. I remember when the album “One of These Nights” was released that there was a special on the radio which I taped. At that time my mate Fog and I were working over Christmas at a wire factory and we played it over and over again.

James Taylor – Fire and Rain, Carolina on my mind, Sweet Baby James and others were favourites. I had a group of friends and we called ourselves The Diggers. We were mainly mates from High School plus a few who we met through our university studies. Not a lot in the way of disposable income so we spent a lot of time sitting around houses playing guitars and harmonicas singing lots of James Taylor and Bob Dylan songs.

Little River Band – Harmonies every bit as good as those of the Eagles and for a while The Diggers mucked around with a band playing LRB songs. We called ourselves The Sentimental Blokes and were legends in our own loungerooms. We never had any intention of performing anywhere it was just a way of having fun and a lot of laughs.

At least three of those guys have passed away now but whenever I hear those songs I’m transported back to a simpler time and place and the boisterousness of youth, with the voices of mates still ringing loudly in my ears.

The Power of Music

Having been scanning photos for the past week has lead to a trigger of memories where you can recall the actual time, place and circumstances surrounding the capturing of that particular moment in time and it got me thinking about other things that trigger memory such as smell and music. So I thought I’d write a little about some of the music that means something to me.

Elvis Presley – I remember arguing with some other kids at Primary School about who was better Elvis or The Beatles and I argued strongly for the former. I grew up watching Elvis movies and the first records I ever bought were his – Edge of Reality, Suspicious Minds, In the Ghetto and Don’t Cry Daddy. I knew them word for word and some might say that the famous Joyce snarl that appears occasionally on my face may have had it’s genesis some time during those Saturday afternoon matinees at the Padua Theatre in Brunswick.

The Eagles – around Form 2 we had an American exchange teacher at Burwood High School and he brought with him The Eagles album Desperado. We must have had a rainy day one day and stayed in the class room over lunch time listening to the sublime harmonies and ballads of these blokes on a concept album of all things. Something at that time that I’d never heard of before. I have remained a fan ever since. I remember when the album “One of These Nights” was released that there was a special on the radio which I taped. At that time my mate Fog and I were working over Christmas at a wire factory and we played it over and over again.

James Taylor – Fire and Rain, Carolina on my mind, Sweet Baby James and others were favourites. I had a group of friends and we called ourselves The Diggers. We were mainly mates from High School plus a few who we met through our university studies. Not a lot in the way of disposable income so we spent a lot of time sitting around houses playing guitars and harmonicas singing lots of James Taylor and Bob Dylan songs.

Little River Band – Harmonies every bit as good as those of the Eagles and for a while The Diggers mucked around with a band playing LRB songs. We called ourselves The Sentimental Blokes and were legends in our own loungerooms. We never had any intention of performing anywhere it was just a way of having fun and a lot of laughs.

At least three of those guys have passed away now but whenever I hear those songs I’m transported back to a simpler time and place and the boisterousness of youth, with the voices of mates still ringing loudly in my ears.