Volvo Drivers

I’ve been back home from the south coast of New South Wales for a couple of weeks now and haven’t found the time to blog much.  Lots to say and so little time.   However, I thought I’d mention this observation and ask whether it is the same in other parts of the world.

On our last nigh of holiday we decided to have fish and chips for dinner.  Now in a seaside town during the high holiday season that usually means waiting up to an hour for the food after ordering.  Generally it’s worth the wait and I usually take a book to read while I’m waiting anyway.

On this night as i drove down the main street a volvo driver decided to stop in the middle of the road in front of me, no indicator, no spare car space for him to wait for, he just decided to prop.  Being in holiday mode myself I probably showed a bit more patience than usual and waited behind him, figuring that sooner or later he would decide what he wanted to do.  But he didn’t.  And as I sat and watched as a couple of minutes rushed by I saw around 20 other people enter the fish and chip shop ahead of me.   Already resigned to a long wait I knew it would be longer because that Volvo driver was totally oblivious to everyone else around him.

Then on the way home the next day I found myself passing another Volvo driver around a dozen times.  He would slow down on the sections of the Princes Highway that had double lines or many curves where there was no opportunity to pass and then when an overtaking lane appeared he would move from 20 kph below the speed limit to 10 above it.  What do these people think?  Is it a deliberate ploy to make the rest of the non-Volvo world angry?   Anyway I’d speed up enough to pass him, then slow back down to the speed limit only to find he would pass me again and wait until we hit the no passing areas before once again dropping to 20kph below the speed limit.

So tell me – have you noticed the same type of behaviour from volvo drivers where you come from?

Advertisements

Volvo Drivers

I’ve been back home from the south coast of New South Wales for a couple of weeks now and haven’t found the time to blog much.  Lots to say and so little time.   However, I thought I’d mention this observation and ask whether it is the same in other parts of the world.

On our last nigh of holiday we decided to have fish and chips for dinner.  Now in a seaside town during the high holiday season that usually means waiting up to an hour for the food after ordering.  Generally it’s worth the wait and I usually take a book to read while I’m waiting anyway.

On this night as i drove down the main street a volvo driver decided to stop in the middle of the road in front of me, no indicator, no spare car space for him to wait for, he just decided to prop.  Being in holiday mode myself I probably showed a bit more patience than usual and waited behind him, figuring that sooner or later he would decide what he wanted to do.  But he didn’t.  And as I sat and watched as a couple of minutes rushed by I saw around 20 other people enter the fish and chip shop ahead of me.   Already resigned to a long wait I knew it would be longer because that Volvo driver was totally oblivious to everyone else around him.

Then on the way home the next day I found myself passing another Volvo driver around a dozen times.  He would slow down on the sections of the Princes Highway that had double lines or many curves where there was no opportunity to pass and then when an overtaking lane appeared he would move from 20 kph below the speed limit to 10 above it.  What do these people think?  Is it a deliberate ploy to make the rest of the non-Volvo world angry?   Anyway I’d speed up enough to pass him, then slow back down to the speed limit only to find he would pass me again and wait until we hit the no passing areas before once again dropping to 20kph below the speed limit.

So tell me – have you noticed the same type of behaviour from volvo drivers where you come from?

Driving

I got my drivers licence when I was 19 years old – I think – I say that because I don’t think I was one of those who rushed out when I turned 18 and got it straight away. For starters, I didn’t have a car, secondly, the whole process of learning to drive was a terrible ordeal. I can’t remember Dad taking me out for lessons, I do remember what a terrible passenger my mother was, so sitting next to her whilst she was trying to teach me was close to a fate worse than death. I clearly remember, one time, after I’d had my licence for a few years and was driving her somewhere, pulling up the car throwing her the keys and telling her to drive herself.

Now I have three of my kids with licences and I have some sympathy for my mother. Son number one’s first lesson was in a new housing estate at Narooma one Christmas and the very first time he turned the engine on with the steering wheel on full lock, lifted the clutch and spun the wheels in the gravel shoulder, catapulting us straight towards a ditch and barbed wire fence, forcing me to yank on the hand break, I knew it was going to be an experience.

I visited the US back in 1991 and on the way home in the car my youngest gave me a running commentary on where her brother had nearly run off the road because he was talking, or looking at his watch, or adjusting the rearview mirror. None of that was too bad, but then she said, “And that’s where he nearly ran over Evan Higgins”, a neighbours kid who in trying to cross the road had waved to my son. Unfortunately he felt the obligation to wave back and in taking one hand off the wheel forgot to straighten it as he came around the corner, veering directly at the kid who was trying to be friendly.

I wasn’t that great a driver when I look back. Like most I did some stupid things like the time I got Mum’s HT Holden up to 100 miles an hour on a country road near Corowa one Christmas.

When I joined the police force I had to do a number of specialist driving courses and it was only then that I actually learnt how to drive defensively, but at speed and safely. The best course I did was just before Pope John Paul II was visiting the State and I was chosen as one of the drivers for the visit. We learnt all sorts of fun stuff like hand break turns and reverse 180’s, stuff that at the time gave you a great deal of confidence in your own ability.

But, I’ve also learnt that it is a skill that needs to be practiced and we often lapse into lazy bad habits when we drive. How many of us, have drifted off on occasions, gone into auto pilot only to wake up and wonder what happened over the last few seconds. Dangerous things that need only a little tilt of the X factor to end in disaster. I’ve had my share of near misses, nearly got cleaned up by a Semi trailer one day when it crept over double lines onto my side of the road. I have been t-boned once by a bloke who was reading a Melways [which is a Melbourne Street Directory] balanced on his steering wheel at the time. It was his bad luck that the car I was driving and the one he hit was full of five uniformed coppers, all of whom fortunately, were able to walk away from the car with a few minor cuts and bruises.

Driving

I got my drivers licence when I was 19 years old – I think – I say that because I don’t think I was one of those who rushed out when I turned 18 and got it straight away. For starters, I didn’t have a car, secondly, the whole process of learning to drive was a terrible ordeal. I can’t remember Dad taking me out for lessons, I do remember what a terrible passenger my mother was, so sitting next to her whilst she was trying to teach me was close to a fate worse than death. I clearly remember, one time, after I’d had my licence for a few years and was driving her somewhere, pulling up the car throwing her the keys and telling her to drive herself.

Now I have three of my kids with licences and I have some sympathy for my mother. Son number one’s first lesson was in a new housing estate at Narooma one Christmas and the very first time he turned the engine on with the steering wheel on full lock, lifted the clutch and spun the wheels in the gravel shoulder, catapulting us straight towards a ditch and barbed wire fence, forcing me to yank on the hand break, I knew it was going to be an experience.

I visited the US back in 1991 and on the way home in the car my youngest gave me a running commentary on where her brother had nearly run off the road because he was talking, or looking at his watch, or adjusting the rearview mirror. None of that was too bad, but then she said, “And that’s where he nearly ran over Evan Higgins”, a neighbours kid who in trying to cross the road had waved to my son. Unfortunately he felt the obligation to wave back and in taking one hand off the wheel forgot to straighten it as he came around the corner, veering directly at the kid who was trying to be friendly.

I wasn’t that great a driver when I look back. Like most I did some stupid things like the time I got Mum’s HT Holden up to 100 miles an hour on a country road near Corowa one Christmas.

When I joined the police force I had to do a number of specialist driving courses and it was only then that I actually learnt how to drive defensively, but at speed and safely. The best course I did was just before Pope John Paul II was visiting the State and I was chosen as one of the drivers for the visit. We learnt all sorts of fun stuff like hand break turns and reverse 180’s, stuff that at the time gave you a great deal of confidence in your own ability.

But, I’ve also learnt that it is a skill that needs to be practiced and we often lapse into lazy bad habits when we drive. How many of us, have drifted off on occasions, gone into auto pilot only to wake up and wonder what happened over the last few seconds. Dangerous things that need only a little tilt of the X factor to end in disaster. I’ve had my share of near misses, nearly got cleaned up by a Semi trailer one day when it crept over double lines onto my side of the road. I have been t-boned once by a bloke who was reading a Melways [which is a Melbourne Street Directory] balanced on his steering wheel at the time. It was his bad luck that the car I was driving and the one he hit was full of five uniformed coppers, all of whom fortunately, were able to walk away from the car with a few minor cuts and bruises.