Trust is like virginity…

…once gone it’s very hard to get back.
I’ve told this story twice in comments on other sites in the past day both for very different reasons.   Firstly over at Paisley’s site it was made to make a point about trust being earned by people whom we regard as experts.  Secondly over on That Darn Girl’s blog it was made in a much more flippant manner.

But given the synchronicity I thought that I’d re-tell the story here.

A number of years ago I tore a groin muscle playing basketball.  In some pain and wondering whether I might need some extra investigation to see how bad the tear was I decided to attend at my local GP’s.   After telling him that I had felt the groin tear whilst running down the court the previous night he asked me to drop my dax and climb onto the examination table.  He then grabbed me by the balls and asked me to cough and came to the conclusion that I had an infection whereupon he prescribed a course of antibiotics.

Needless to say I didn’t fill the prescription nor did I ever go back to his surgery again.  So like I said at the beginning of this post there is a certain amount of automatic trust we invest in people because of the position they hold, but it may only take one little breach in that trust to find that it is gone forever.  And once gone it is really hard to get it back.

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Cartoon from Cartoonstock

Trust is like virginity…

…once gone it’s very hard to get back.
I’ve told this story twice in comments on other sites in the past day both for very different reasons.   Firstly over at Paisley’s site it was made to make a point about trust being earned by people whom we regard as experts.  Secondly over on That Darn Girl’s blog it was made in a much more flippant manner.

But given the synchronicity I thought that I’d re-tell the story here.

A number of years ago I tore a groin muscle playing basketball.  In some pain and wondering whether I might need some extra investigation to see how bad the tear was I decided to attend at my local GP’s.   After telling him that I had felt the groin tear whilst running down the court the previous night he asked me to drop my dax and climb onto the examination table.  He then grabbed me by the balls and asked me to cough and came to the conclusion that I had an infection whereupon he prescribed a course of antibiotics.

Needless to say I didn’t fill the prescription nor did I ever go back to his surgery again.  So like I said at the beginning of this post there is a certain amount of automatic trust we invest in people because of the position they hold, but it may only take one little breach in that trust to find that it is gone forever.  And once gone it is really hard to get it back.

**********************************

Cartoon from Cartoonstock

Nerds and DNA

I’ll admit it.  I’m a nerd.  And in some eyes maybe a little weird because one of my interests has been in genealogy and my family history.  It’s not something I’ve spent a lot of time writing about here but for a number of years it was a consuming passion.  Without going into a lot of detail I am descended from four Roamn Catholic Irish convicts on my paternal Grandfathers side, from a bunch of orangemen on dad’s Mum’s side, and on my Mum’s side a mxture of English, Scot, Irish and Australian Aborigine.

A few weeks ago I read in one of the local papers about the DNA Ancestry Project.    For a fee anyone can have their DNA examined and linked to various genetypes and the related places of origin.   For example did you know that in 5th Century Ireland there was a King called Niall of the Nine Hostages, who had 12 sons and from whom as many as three million people alive today are descended.   In fact one in every five men in north western Ireland and one in ten men in Scotland carry the same Y chromosone DNA as Niall.

For men there are two types of tests that can be done – the Y chromosone is passed down the male line from father to son, and that of the mitochondrial DNA we all inherit from our mothers and their mothers.  Women of course can only do the second test because they don’t carry the y chromosone.

So at some stage in the next few months I think I will order a participation kit.  Tracing my female line should finally confirm my aboriginality on mothers side, and given Michael Joyce,my great great Grandfather, came from County Galway it will be interesting to see if I am descended from Niall of the 9 hostages.

Nerds and DNA

I’ll admit it.  I’m a nerd.  And in some eyes maybe a little weird because one of my interests has been in genealogy and my family history.  It’s not something I’ve spent a lot of time writing about here but for a number of years it was a consuming passion.  Without going into a lot of detail I am descended from four Roamn Catholic Irish convicts on my paternal Grandfathers side, from a bunch of orangemen on dad’s Mum’s side, and on my Mum’s side a mxture of English, Scot, Irish and Australian Aborigine.

A few weeks ago I read in one of the local papers about the DNA Ancestry Project.    For a fee anyone can have their DNA examined and linked to various genetypes and the related places of origin.   For example did you know that in 5th Century Ireland there was a King called Niall of the Nine Hostages, who had 12 sons and from whom as many as three million people alive today are descended.   In fact one in every five men in north western Ireland and one in ten men in Scotland carry the same Y chromosone DNA as Niall.

For men there are two types of tests that can be done – the Y chromosone is passed down the male line from father to son, and that of the mitochondrial DNA we all inherit from our mothers and their mothers.  Women of course can only do the second test because they don’t carry the y chromosone.

So at some stage in the next few months I think I will order a participation kit.  Tracing my female line should finally confirm my aboriginality on mothers side, and given Michael Joyce,my great great Grandfather, came from County Galway it will be interesting to see if I am descended from Niall of the 9 hostages.

Toes and genetic defects

It was almost a year ago when we were heading off to Thailand on what was to be my first overseas holiday.  I kept a journal and had every intention of typing it up for this blog but then I got sacked, had to find a new job, moved house and found a few other things to deal with like putting the blog into stealth mode for months because of some strange visitors.   Anyway, it’s a year on and I thought I would commence to post some of the stories of the trip.   Here is the first.

4th February 2008
…on return to the hotel this afternoon we decided to have a massage special for 200 baht for an hour.

As luck would have it all the young masseuses were already busy so I got the matriarch of the crew.   Now whilst she didn’t look like another well known Melbourne matriarch [she had two eyes for a start] she shared her penchant for inflicting pain.

This commenced with a foot massage – toes ripped from sockets, feet bent indirections they were never intended to go, pressure points found in spots where I thought there was only skin.

It was totally silent in the room, the other six women who were being worked on all appeared to be in relaxed states of sleep or unconsciousness.   The only sound were my grunts of pain or squeals when a finger found a particularly sore spot.

Every now and then she would stop and say something in Thai which I’m sure meant “Have a listen to this wuss”, or, “Get a load of his weird little toes.”   And all the other masseurs would burst out with huge belly laughs.

Just when I thought it was getting safe again she told me to roll over.  Now no one ever told me that a Thai foot massage meant that a Thai woman would walk up and down your back digging her feet into your spinal cord.  I flet like Id been run over by a tuk tuk.

************************************************
A couple of weeks later we had moved onto Chang Mai and decided to have another massage.  Time hadn’t made the heart grow fonder but had certainly dulled the memory of the pain of the first one.  This time we were seated in chairs and it was a couple of young blokes who worked on us, just as painfully.  But what I remember most is that when I took off my shoes the bloke working on me looked at my toes, nudged the guy next to him, said something I couldn’t understand and they both burst out laughing.  Are they really that weird?

Toes and genetic defects

It was almost a year ago when we were heading off to Thailand on what was to be my first overseas holiday.  I kept a journal and had every intention of typing it up for this blog but then I got sacked, had to find a new job, moved house and found a few other things to deal with like putting the blog into stealth mode for months because of some strange visitors.   Anyway, it’s a year on and I thought I would commence to post some of the stories of the trip.   Here is the first.

4th February 2008
…on return to the hotel this afternoon we decided to have a massage special for 200 baht for an hour.

As luck would have it all the young masseuses were already busy so I got the matriarch of the crew.   Now whilst she didn’t look like another well known Melbourne matriarch [she had two eyes for a start] she shared her penchant for inflicting pain.

This commenced with a foot massage – toes ripped from sockets, feet bent indirections they were never intended to go, pressure points found in spots where I thought there was only skin.

It was totally silent in the room, the other six women who were being worked on all appeared to be in relaxed states of sleep or unconsciousness.   The only sound were my grunts of pain or squeals when a finger found a particularly sore spot.

Every now and then she would stop and say something in Thai which I’m sure meant “Have a listen to this wuss”, or, “Get a load of his weird little toes.”   And all the other masseurs would burst out with huge belly laughs.

Just when I thought it was getting safe again she told me to roll over.  Now no one ever told me that a Thai foot massage meant that a Thai woman would walk up and down your back digging her feet into your spinal cord.  I flet like Id been run over by a tuk tuk.

************************************************
A couple of weeks later we had moved onto Chang Mai and decided to have another massage.  Time hadn’t made the heart grow fonder but had certainly dulled the memory of the pain of the first one.  This time we were seated in chairs and it was a couple of young blokes who worked on us, just as painfully.  But what I remember most is that when I took off my shoes the bloke working on me looked at my toes, nudged the guy next to him, said something I couldn’t understand and they both burst out laughing.  Are they really that weird?

Bush Lore

These have been doing the rounds and as a great fan of Yogi Bera I thought it was worth looking at how George Dubya had assumed the mantle. 
‘The vast majority of our imports come from outside the country.’
– George W. Bush
‘If we don’t succeed, we run the risk of failure.’
– George W. Bush
‘One word sums up probably the responsibility of any Governor, and that one word is ‘to be prepared’.’
-George W. Bush
‘I have made good judgments in the past. I have made good judgments in the future.’
– George W. Bush
‘The future will be better tomorrow.’
– George W. Bush
We’re going to have the best educated American people in the world.’
– George W. Bush
‘I stand by all the misstatements that I’ve made.’
– George W Bush
‘We have a firm commitment to NATO, we are a part of NATO. We have a firm commitment to Europe. We are a part of Europe ‘
– George W. Bush
‘Public speaking is very easy.’
– George W. Bush
‘A low voter turnout is an indication of fewer people going to the polls.’
– George W. Bush
‘I have opinions of my own –strong opinions– but I don’t always agree with them.’
-George Bush
‘We are ready for any unforeseen event that may or may not occur.’
– George W. Bush
‘For NASA, space is still a high priority.’
-George W. Bush
‘Quite frankly, teachers are the only profession that teach our children.’
-George W. Bush
‘It isn’t pollution that’s harming the environment. It’s the impurities in our air and water that are doing it.’
– George W. Bush

And with that let us bid adieu.    Whether it is fond or not I will leave to my American friends to decide.

Bush Lore

These have been doing the rounds and as a great fan of Yogi Bera I thought it was worth looking at how George Dubya had assumed the mantle. 
‘The vast majority of our imports come from outside the country.’
– George W. Bush
‘If we don’t succeed, we run the risk of failure.’
– George W. Bush
‘One word sums up probably the responsibility of any Governor, and that one word is ‘to be prepared’.’
-George W. Bush
‘I have made good judgments in the past. I have made good judgments in the future.’
– George W. Bush
‘The future will be better tomorrow.’
– George W. Bush
We’re going to have the best educated American people in the world.’
– George W. Bush
‘I stand by all the misstatements that I’ve made.’
– George W Bush
‘We have a firm commitment to NATO, we are a part of NATO. We have a firm commitment to Europe. We are a part of Europe ‘
– George W. Bush
‘Public speaking is very easy.’
– George W. Bush
‘A low voter turnout is an indication of fewer people going to the polls.’
– George W. Bush
‘I have opinions of my own –strong opinions– but I don’t always agree with them.’
-George Bush
‘We are ready for any unforeseen event that may or may not occur.’
– George W. Bush
‘For NASA, space is still a high priority.’
-George W. Bush
‘Quite frankly, teachers are the only profession that teach our children.’
-George W. Bush
‘It isn’t pollution that’s harming the environment. It’s the impurities in our air and water that are doing it.’
– George W. Bush

And with that let us bid adieu.    Whether it is fond or not I will leave to my American friends to decide.

Volvo Drivers

I’ve been back home from the south coast of New South Wales for a couple of weeks now and haven’t found the time to blog much.  Lots to say and so little time.   However, I thought I’d mention this observation and ask whether it is the same in other parts of the world.

On our last nigh of holiday we decided to have fish and chips for dinner.  Now in a seaside town during the high holiday season that usually means waiting up to an hour for the food after ordering.  Generally it’s worth the wait and I usually take a book to read while I’m waiting anyway.

On this night as i drove down the main street a volvo driver decided to stop in the middle of the road in front of me, no indicator, no spare car space for him to wait for, he just decided to prop.  Being in holiday mode myself I probably showed a bit more patience than usual and waited behind him, figuring that sooner or later he would decide what he wanted to do.  But he didn’t.  And as I sat and watched as a couple of minutes rushed by I saw around 20 other people enter the fish and chip shop ahead of me.   Already resigned to a long wait I knew it would be longer because that Volvo driver was totally oblivious to everyone else around him.

Then on the way home the next day I found myself passing another Volvo driver around a dozen times.  He would slow down on the sections of the Princes Highway that had double lines or many curves where there was no opportunity to pass and then when an overtaking lane appeared he would move from 20 kph below the speed limit to 10 above it.  What do these people think?  Is it a deliberate ploy to make the rest of the non-Volvo world angry?   Anyway I’d speed up enough to pass him, then slow back down to the speed limit only to find he would pass me again and wait until we hit the no passing areas before once again dropping to 20kph below the speed limit.

So tell me – have you noticed the same type of behaviour from volvo drivers where you come from?

Volvo Drivers

I’ve been back home from the south coast of New South Wales for a couple of weeks now and haven’t found the time to blog much.  Lots to say and so little time.   However, I thought I’d mention this observation and ask whether it is the same in other parts of the world.

On our last nigh of holiday we decided to have fish and chips for dinner.  Now in a seaside town during the high holiday season that usually means waiting up to an hour for the food after ordering.  Generally it’s worth the wait and I usually take a book to read while I’m waiting anyway.

On this night as i drove down the main street a volvo driver decided to stop in the middle of the road in front of me, no indicator, no spare car space for him to wait for, he just decided to prop.  Being in holiday mode myself I probably showed a bit more patience than usual and waited behind him, figuring that sooner or later he would decide what he wanted to do.  But he didn’t.  And as I sat and watched as a couple of minutes rushed by I saw around 20 other people enter the fish and chip shop ahead of me.   Already resigned to a long wait I knew it would be longer because that Volvo driver was totally oblivious to everyone else around him.

Then on the way home the next day I found myself passing another Volvo driver around a dozen times.  He would slow down on the sections of the Princes Highway that had double lines or many curves where there was no opportunity to pass and then when an overtaking lane appeared he would move from 20 kph below the speed limit to 10 above it.  What do these people think?  Is it a deliberate ploy to make the rest of the non-Volvo world angry?   Anyway I’d speed up enough to pass him, then slow back down to the speed limit only to find he would pass me again and wait until we hit the no passing areas before once again dropping to 20kph below the speed limit.

So tell me – have you noticed the same type of behaviour from volvo drivers where you come from?

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